The God’less Saga

godless enhancedThe God’less Saga:

When Man went into space God didn’t follow.

What he got was a disease that made him more violent than before. Called God’s Loneliness it was soon shortened to The God’less.

But it showed up only in a gravity well or through one of the gravity gates that let Man travel to the ends of the galaxy.

When the disease did show up, back home on Earth, it was up to the Roman Catholic Church and the Corporations to find a way to cope.

Ashley Book is a child of that schema. Her father raised her to fight the God’less, told her she would have choices in space with the Corporations.

But he’s keeping secrets, pushing her to find out for herself why he calls her the truth of mankind.

Once she’s in space, everyone wants her dead, except her best friend, Ghost.

And God tells Ashley she won’t survive if they’re not friends.

The God’less Saga is now live

Spotlight

A spotlight on Wolf, in Britain, no less.  http://indiebrits.blogspot.co.uk/

Progress

Progress on the God’less Saga is going well. I’ve reached the resolution and have about ten to fifteen thousand words left to write. I’m really happy with the story and the way it’s turned out. I have an editor set up to go through it when I’m finished. I found a cover that rocks and the photographer has agreed to a price so that I can use it.

I got my first two star review on Wolf, out of six four and five star reviews. That bummed me out but it was an honest review, one person’s opinion, so I thanked them. What else can one do? It’s part of the writing gig.

I’ve gotten a short story into a horror anthology, due out for October. I’ve given two stories to a charity anthology, no idea if they’ve been accepted but I have high hopes. They are good stories.

And last but not least, I have two publishers interested in the same story, both asked for the full manuscript. Decisions pending. But this is cool.

It’s about story. Go hug someone today.

Smile at the world.

Excerpt from Wolf:

Hands poked at her body. Her tail was lifted in the air and then dropped. The same thing done with a paw. Then the hands picked her up and carried her. She could smell the tooth-spitters they carried. The burnt stone smell mingled with the scent of men, musky, like the sweat of a badger. The crisp smell of urine flowed from one of the men.

She knew that man. He was the one she had warned away from Michael and the not-cub. He hadn’t put his hands on her. She knew that too. From the smell of him, he was two metres in front of her. The crunch of the snow under his boots had a nervous quality to it, as if the sound itself shivered.

After a time, the motion of the men stopped and she felt herself placed on a cold surface.

 

 

“Get in the chopper, Harris.”

Sergeant Thomas Jenkins didn’t understand. His men weren’t cowards. But four of them had died in less than three minutes. That didn’t seem possible. Nothing he had fought had ever been that fast, nor that deadly, not unless it was missile based. True, two of the deaths had been from a rifle. The poor sod using it had been taken out by a wolf bigger than the one on the chopper floor. But the thing that had attacked Michael Scott was dead. Without a brainpan, it was just an oddity for the taxidermist. Gerund had mentioned a woman or a wolf that travelled with Michael Scott. A wolf was in the chopper. Jenkins didn’t know anything about a second animal. Or what Harris was ranting about . . . the man was tech support, not recon. Why did the company let people cross train without the skills? Jenkins just shook his head.

excerpt from Wolf

“Easy girl. Shhhh,” Michael said. Even though gun trained, the horse was skittish.

Michael felt a pang of guilt low in his belly. He was supposed to protect these animals; they weren’t friends, but he understood them, cared for them in ways that went beyond any kind of pet-human relationship. His horses were an extension of the survival they met together, here in the Rockies. They needed each other. Depended on the other for so much more than just companionship.

He took a kit bag from the wall, some bandages and ointments, and then walked slowly forwards, talking all the way. It wasn’t the words that were important, it was the tone of voice he used. Soothing calm that flowed from him to his riding horse. It took a long time for peace to settle into place in the confines of the cave. At least it felt that way. When he opened the stall gate, his horse shied away.

“Easy. It’s okay.”

Finally, Chaka let him touch her throat, and run a hand over her hide to find the damage the wolf had left. Besides the bite on the neck, there were claw marks high up on both flanks and shoulders. The horse had bucked the wolf off. Michael had been far enough into the cave to put the first shot into the wolf’s side when it landed. And then Faelon had attacked.

Michael took a med dispenser from the kit and filled it with painkillers from a Sealpak. The soft hiss of air almost startled the animal again, but the lessening of pain it had been feeling was soothing. Michael moved the local anesthesia to the area around the other wounds. Chaka barely noticed the hiss. Next, he took an antiseptic and cloth and cleaned the wounds. He took his time, again, glad he could do something other than be anxious. He didn’t bother to look behind, knowing Chaka was a better alarm than any other right now. But he wanted to look, to see Faelon standing there, alive.

A Request for Reviews.

If you’ve read Wolf, please take the time to write a review, I’d appreciate it.
Thank you.

Another excerpt from Wolf:
The moonlight shimmered over the landscape like silver escaping a forge. Dawn would turn the snow into molten gold soon.
It was cold. Freezing without the shirt he had packed into Faelon’s wounds. Michael carried her to the cabin. For all the weight of her body, she felt too light. Her head lolled at an angle that seemed disjointed, as if her spine had been severed. Or, as if she had no life left in her wolfen body.
But her spine was intact, and her heart beat in her chest, though it seemed weak to him. He thought that was just because of the way his hands shook as he had tried to sense her pulse and feel her heartbeat, the task made all the more difficult for the thick fur that covered her body. It was like trying to feel an elevator’s vibration in an earthquake.
He brushed the door open with his shoulder. In his haste to save the horses he had left it open. A few quick steps, and he laid Faelon gently on the bed.
“PAC. Proximity Mode. Medical.” Michael pulled the Nano-tech that was less a machine and more a personal bodyguard from his desk, from where it had been teaching Faelon. “Monitor Faelon. Administer any drugs needed.” He slipped the tech around her foreleg. It shrank into place. He knew the touch would also complete the Home Advantage command he had introduced earlier.
PAC fed Nano-filaments into her body. “Monitoring. Medical Mode. Pulse weakened, heartbeat steady. Her cell structure is showing the same signs as her saliva but at a greatly increased rate. Recommend you remove the wadding from her wounds before her flesh grows into place around it.”
His shirt?
Michael pulled at the cloth gently. His face contorted as the material slowly lifted up, taking tissue and hair with it. A low whine echoed from Faelon’s throat.

Hug someone today.

We live in an amazing world.

I write about amazing worlds and technology, but it doesn’t come from nowhere. It comes from our world. The one we all share. It’s out there, amazing and beautiful and encompassing, making our lives better and richer, there’s an argument there, and fuller.

Want an example: the 3D printer brought us a mainstream way to get a plastic gun in every hand, as long as you have the money for a printer; approx 2500.00 dollars, and the bullet to go with it.There are moral issues that go with this but that’s not the point of this article. This is: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/story/2013/06/07/business-3d-printing-video.html  A 3D printer that makes viable working liver cells. the tech isn’t applicable yet, I don’t think, but it means a huge step forward for medical advances and the availability of body parts. Need a new heart? A new liver? A skin draft. I know I’m extrapolating but that’s the point.

Invisibility used to be only in the realm of magic. http://mashable.com/2013/06/19/super-power-tech/ Now, there are scientific proofs that have the tech coming into the forefront of science. you won’t be able to sneak out of math class yet, but one day… there are 7 more tech advances in this link. Check them out.

And here is a machine that works in the body without the fluids affecting the electronics. http://news.yahoo.com/electronics-withstand-bodily-fluids-140107275.html Pacemakers are sealed from the body for rejection issues, so this is a step forward for organ implants.

There is always a negative to technology, just like with guns, weapons, electricity, but that’s a matter of application as much as the destructive potential of the technology.

How do you want technology used? Need a new heart?

Have a hug from me today. Then find one closer to your life.

Excerpt from Wolf: A Military P.A.C. Novel

In snowshoes, his movement was hampered. He didn’t have much choice, so he kept his knife low, his stance ready and spread out, as a hundred kilos of wolf bore down on him, the growl in his ears deafening. The wolf’s arc would bring its teeth to his throat. Michael crouched down and raised his knife, thrusting with all his weight. He felt the blade bite deep into the wolf’s underside, the hilt meeting its hide and burying deep. The wolf twisted its head and drove its teeth into Michael’s right shoulder. His hand slipped from the knife. He collapsed, following the wolf’s arc to the ground as best he could, lessening the force, reducing the tearing of his jacket and hopefully the flesh underneath. He heard Faelon then, her weight slamming into the other wolf with a thud as they rolled away from him, snow exploding outward. He finally got a look at the wolf as it snarled and ravaged at Faelon, trying to tear her apart. Its body was black in colour, turning to a dark grey on its limbs and paws. Its hair was spiked with rage, and its eyes glared with darkness, as if its colouring was showing its personality as well. It was easy to see Faelon against its dark fur; she possessed the same brindle coat as her hair in human form.

Then silence descended on the forest as the two wolves untwisted from each other as if they had to see each other to make the next move. Then Michael saw what he had gone through with Faelon himself—only he had won that dominance game. Locked in the stare, Faelon took an aggressive stance, her fur standing up, a growl thrumming through the air. The other wolf’s stance was defensive. It stood slightly crouched, its back up, and tail hung low. The intruder turned and melted into the forest. Blood stained the snow, puddles of it trailing after the male.

Kindle Promo

The promo I ran on Kindle the other day for Wolf: A Military P.A.C. Novel was, in my opinion, very successful. Almost 1700 downloads. Now if just ten percent of them write a review…I’d really appreciate it.
Thank you to all who shared this on their page or in their network. I found the whole promo humbling and vital.
Thank you again.

Another Review For Wolf: A Military P.A.C. Novel

Wolf: A Military P.A.C. Novel (Kindle Edition) A highly original, highly imaginative Speculative Fiction story blending ancient Navajo lore, mythology, and magic with military operations and futuristic ultra-high-tech gear, and laced with passion and sexual tension. Engrossing and thought-provoking, the novel features larger-than-life characters and situations, set in the spectacular backdrop of the Canadian Rockies. A great, entertaining read.

P.ersonal A.daptive C.omputer

P.A.C. is the advanced tech that resides at the heart of Wolf. It’s a machine that learns, grows, adapts, and can become independent with all that implies: free will. There are five of them in various states of growth by the ending chapter of Wolf. The man that invented them, Robert Scott, designed them as a single unit with each one being a node to the finished product. He has plans for them to be something larger than they are as individuals. But they have to get there first. What Robert didn’t understand when he made them was what the bonding process would do to each node. He forgot something: human beings are insane.

All of them.